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Search Results 60 to 75 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)
expensive to do business in countries like china. our workers have become even more productive. our energy costs are starting to go down here in the united states. and we still have the largest market. so when you factor in everything, it makes sense to invest here, in america. and that's one of the reasons why american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace since the 1990s. and thanks in part to that boost in manufacturing, four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our economy is growing again. our businesses have created more than 5.5 million new jobs over the past 33 months. so we're making progress. [applause] we're moving in the right direction. we're going forward. so what we need to do is simple. we need to keep going. we need to keep going forward. we should do everything we can to keep creating good middle- class jobs that help folks rebuild security for their families. [applause] and we should do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do -- i just got to say this -- wh
is the economic power house already now and in the future. you have china militarizing in that region, north korea and so much commerce, money, and trade that everyone depends on now in asia. to have the militarization of the region by two such uncertain countries with uncertain tensions it is a chilling affect on the world economy. first the u.s., the national security concern about what north korea mooib might do. the deeper, broader, long-term concern about economics and trade in the region, but for them to achieve this kind of success with a long-range missile launch, that means combined with their nuclear program, by the way, of course means the concern now full tilt that they have the capability for an intercontinental ballistic missile launch, potentially in the future with a nuclear warhead and that could put hawaii, alaska and the west coast of the united states one day at risk. >> victor cha, when the government says at no time was the missile or the debris a threat to america. is it a matter of time before kim jong-un is a threat to america. >> it is only a matter of time and the time i
. let's look at the rankings to see where the u.s. falls and south korea falls. coming in first in china, south korea, then finland and an u.s.a. number 24. math is similar: >> cenk: we're number one. >> now similar story again when it comes to science: >> that in in a's really kicking our ass. >> cenk: that would be another segment. >> cenk: number one. >> now barack obama has been on the record saying really great things about the educational system in south korea. let's take a look. >> our children, listen to this, our children spend over a month less in school than children in south korea every year. that's no way to prepare them for a 21st century economy. >> well, he's right. if you look at the number, south korea spends 220 days a year in class, in the u.s., 180 days per year. in finland it's 190. with south korea and finland you have two opposite ends of the spectrum. turns out both work. we can have a discussion as to what's better, but whatever the u.s. is doing that's not working. when it comes to education funding in korea basically it's the number one in family spending on p
a person's family he is okay and bring him news about life in china or if he has moved to the united states or south korea or some such place, news about that country. and then the exiles who have escaped are doing things like setting up radio stations in south korea that broadcast information to north korea. >> they are beginning, north koreans are beginning to be empowered by information and once they are empowered by information the hope is that they will demand more from their regime. >> greta: i got to go. a great book. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> greta: it is everywhere. does it make the cut for the best viral video? best viral video? don't forget to post y y y y y this family used capital one venture miles to come home for the holidays. that's double miles you can actually use... sadly, their brother's white christmas just got "blacked out." [ brother ] but it's the family party! really jingles your bells, doesn't it? my gift to you! the capital one venture card! for any flight, any time! that's double miles you can actually use! how illuminating. what's in your wallet
of uninhabited lands between japan and china. japan sent eight fighter jets after a chinese plane was seen near the islands. it was gone by the time they got there. china continues to claim the islands. the islands have been in japanese control for years. japan bought the privately owned islands in september. >>> some are calling it a break-through, north korea making its first successful long range rocket launch but less than 24 hours after liftoff a u.s. official tells cnn the country may not be in full control of the satellite. joining me is cnn contributor and retired u.s. army general spider marks. good morning. >> good morning. >> what does this mean? is this a setback for north korea? >> it's not a setback at all for north korea. north korea successfully launched something into an extra atmospheric orbit, albeit it's not control. they were able to build a three-stage missile and get an object into space. >> here is how leon pa net ta spoke about it. he spoke to erin burnett in afghanistan. >> this is a clear provocation. we've warned them not to do it. we've been very concerned about the
so? >> people on his team wanted him to use nuclear weapons against china and -- vietnam. admiral ratford wanted to nuke -- >> how would you nuke in a jungle? >> it's called tactical nuclear weapons. eisenhower threatened to use them. he was good at bluffing. >> is that how he ended korea? >> historians tackled this and -- >> by the way -- >> threatening something worse? >> well, that's what they say. i want to congratulate him, by the way, on this book. i've really enjoyed it, evan. we had talked about it earlier. this is a -- this bluff that you cover in the eisenhower years is a really critical part of the story of that era. it's also a bluff that, in all fairness, condition continues into the kennedy years. the cuban missile years involved the same kind of stakes that happened in berlin and in korea, indochina. eisenhower was a wartime commander and he understood the difficulties in dealing with the soviets but because he commanded the western front in world war ii, he also understood the possibilities for rough or fundamental, i would say, co-existence or cooperation with the
, engineering, and math. if you dig in, the numbers are stunning. you look at the fact that i think china is now roughly 44% of their graduates are in those fields. europe is at 24%. america is at 16% of our graduates. i say this respectfully, knowing we are on c-span, but when the europeans are outdistancing us by 50% in an area as important talent inng human challeng these key fields that will drive innovation, you know we are in trouble. i will correct one comment, the democratic side and marco rubio and jerry moran, we have put forward legislation long before the election that says let's look at this, the competition issue and put forward an approach that many of us, including those of us in the business world, have been talking about for decades. let's recognize that while we know that we do need to prime the pump with science, engineering, math graduates, native-born americans, partly in the numbers with middle school with girls and children of color and the enormous challenges short and long term, we also have to still continue to attract talent from the world. one of the ways that we can
at that route, you're leaving africa, going through central area, up around china, across the bering strait, i'm assuming you're taking a boat and through the americas. one of those, as i'm noticing, the strait line goes right through iran. how do you get through that? >> i think that -- iran straddles an ancient migration path into central asia and ideally it would be wonderful to set off on foot across iran. i'm going to see what relations are like in the late 2015, hopefully they're well enough, good enough, to allow me to go through iran. >> sreenivasan: if there's a necessary detour, how long does that take to get around? >> it's a big place to walk around. part of the beauty, i think, of this long project is that there are going to be obstacles that i don't know answers to about how to get around them until i get there. and we'll see. sarin dip city a big part of this project. >> sreenivasan: what are the types of steps you've been taking? you've been planning this for a last couple years. visas? immunizations. what else? >> there's a lot of logistical planning that's gone into getting m
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
there is large u.s. presence. south korea is calling for more u.s. sanctions. the most important, china, they are saying want a moderate and prudent response. may well go to the u.n. security council this morning. back to you. martha: so how important is it for north korea's missile regime, missile program i should say they were able to launch this weapon successfully? they have seen several failures in the past? >> reporter: well it is a major scientific achievement if you look at it on that level even though a lot of their people are starving in the country. from what the experts are saying they're still a long way off from being able to fire a ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead. there is problems with the heat from reentry, things like that. but it's, they are moving towards that ballistic missile which could threaten in the future the u.s. mainland. but it does seem a political success for the new leader, kim jong-un, this young new leader. he pushed for this rocket to be tested and for once it has been successful. back to you. martha: david, thank you very much. we'll have mo
to pay toward china and the middle east will not let him. there was a successful sabotaging program against iran's nuclear program and a ery new approach of iran's central bank and other institutions that continues to enrich uranium. is kind of're seeing the twilight of america's cold war imperium in the middle east. the u.s. will have a relationship with the new egypt but it will not be the relationship of a client state that we saw with's the minority -- hosni mubarak or on war said sadat. is the changing relationship in the country like pakistan after the osama bin laden raid and in states like yemen. they look over the horizon that bahrain and say, we do not want that. host: one of the papers this morning has a story taking a look at the change in leadership in specific countries in asia and highlighting what is going on in north korea, south korea, and japan. what does that prove for the administration? guest: you can put north korea in the same category as japan and south korea. they have taken power and have produced leaders but are still checked by the open society and by th
Search Results 60 to 75 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)